Winzavod CCA
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Exhibitions

Ivan Plusch
“Sticky fingers effect”

06 March — 15 April 2018
23 pop/off/art gallery

Ivan Plusch
“Sticky fingers effect”

Ivan Plyushch's personal exhibition The Sticky Fingers effect in the pop / off / art gallery continues the ideological line that Ivan built in previous projects, in particular, in the "Passing Process" (parallel program "Manifesta 10", St. Petersburg, 2014) and installation "Red vein" (Moscow Museum of Modern Art, 2017). Ivan Ivy addresses the problem of the possible return of Russia to a frightening historical past, dominated by despotism and violence. The regime in Russia becomes a character: he tries to re-assemble an unviable system from the wreckage of material culture, using nostalgic fragments and patterns - red cloth, a swing, a children's toy house, growing to the present size.

Ivan Plushch works with installation, painting and sound art, creating in the gallery space a huge total installation, each element of which is symbolic. For the first time Ivan Ivy connects in a complex synthesis painting and installation. Red cloth, with which the artist works, turns into a red carpet, referring to power structures, blood-red color symbolizes both a holiday and a war in the culture of many peoples. For a modern person, red color revives the red flag of the revolution, not to mention the state flag of the USSR. The Ivy project "The effect of sticky fingers" refers to the theme of memory through nostalgic images of childhood: the artist constructs a huge swing-scale, at one end of which the children's ball is frozen, and on the other a huge house has grown, "outweighed" all childhood memories.

In the picturesque works of the series, Ivan Plushch uses the method already known to the spectator, strictly delimiting the figure and the background. The background is a particular kind or scene, while the figure is always given large, in the foreground, so that the event horizon is in the same plane as the face of the figure. The figure is blurred, and the background is clearly spelled out; the effect of the spreading of the paint is created with the help of a number of complex techniques, as a result of which it appears that the person is supposed to be washed out or erased in the medium. Also this effect underlines the artist's appeal to the theme of time - as an actual moment and as a duration, in this case - the historical past of our country.

The title of the project refers to the so-called "problem of sticky fingers", the term of physics that studies nanotechnology. The essence of the problem is that the nanorobot can not manipulate individual atoms and build molecules from them with the help of manipulator tools, which also consist of atoms, and, since the interaction between the manipulator of the robot and the atoms - the building material - is inevitable, therefore, the atoms will adhere to each other, preventing the nanorobot from constructing anything functional. Thus, the abstract questions of physics become important for each of us and are reflected in contemporary art: Ivan Ivy creates a subtle political utterance, using complex terms.

Ivan Plyushch was born in 1981 in Leningrad, graduated from the St. Petersburg Art College. N.K. Roerich and the St. Petersburg State Art and Industry Academy. IN AND. Mukhina (in 2009). One of the founders and leaders of the group "Unconquered" (since 2006), a repeated participant of the Youth Biennale, a participant of the parallel program "Manifesto 10" (St. Petersburg, 2015), participant and organizer of numerous contemporary art projects. Ivan is a laureate of the Innovation Award (2013) and the Kuryokhin Prize. His works are in collections of the State Russian Museum, the Moscow Museum of Modern Art, the National Center for Contemporary Art (as part of ROSIZO), as well as in numerous private collections around the world. Lives in St. Petersburg.